rachael short

rachael short

xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 
xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 

xthe-tragic-comedyx:

Part 1 of illustrations by Santiago Caruso for “The Bloody Countess.” 


Santiago Caruso : The Spectral House / Ink and scratching over paper / 32 cm x 24 cm / 2013

In line with my dissertation research, I’ve been looking into other creative who work along gothic/supernatural/fantasy themes and have recently discovered the beautifully grotesque artwork of Santiago Caruso. I love the darkness of his work, both in atmosphere and content.

Santiago Caruso : The Spectral House / Ink and scratching over paper / 32 cm x 24 cm / 2013

In line with my dissertation research, I’ve been looking into other creative who work along gothic/supernatural/fantasy themes and have recently discovered the beautifully grotesque artwork of Santiago Caruso. I love the darkness of his work, both in atmosphere and content.

nemophilies:

Santiago Caruso, The Abyss

nemophilies:

Santiago Caruso, The Abyss

The Art of Drowning

I was reminded recently in a conversation with my dear jonhallsillustration of this short which I fell in love with a few years ago. There’s something about the way people illustrate or paint moving water that really fascinates me, possibly because I’m aware from my own experience, of the Moving Image GIFs below, that it’s quite difficult to capture bubbles and ripples in an effective way.

Anyway, I find this brilliantly done. Another short that I discovered was the ever developing, on-going illustrated ’Johnny Cash Project’ - which you can watch here: http://www.thejohnnycashproject.com/#/explore/TopRated 

Depressing who?

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

ca 1950 Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier
Hard Cover with Dust Jacket by Rein van Looij
full size (1431 x 2146)

I’ve been re-reading an old favourite and found this lovely book cover from the 50’s, so I’m feeling inspired to start designing covers for some other favourites of mine this Summer!

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

ca 1950 Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

Hard Cover with Dust Jacket by Rein van Looij

full size (1431 x 2146)

I’ve been re-reading an old favourite and found this lovely book cover from the 50’s, so I’m feeling inspired to start designing covers for some other favourites of mine this Summer!

My book cover for this years Penguin Design Awards
http://www.penguin.co.uk/static/cs/uk/0/minisites/penguindesignaward/puffin_brief.php
They’re not perfect, but here are my four GIFs for the Moving Image brief! I’m quite pleased with these despite their obvious flaws, they’re naive stylistically but I’ve really enjoyed experimenting with GIFs this year. With more practice over Summer I think I could create some interesting narratives for future briefs.
They’re not perfect, but here are my four GIFs for the Moving Image brief! I’m quite pleased with these despite their obvious flaws, they’re naive stylistically but I’ve really enjoyed experimenting with GIFs this year. With more practice over Summer I think I could create some interesting narratives for future briefs.
They’re not perfect, but here are my four GIFs for the Moving Image brief! I’m quite pleased with these despite their obvious flaws, they’re naive stylistically but I’ve really enjoyed experimenting with GIFs this year. With more practice over Summer I think I could create some interesting narratives for future briefs.
They’re not perfect, but here are my four GIFs for the Moving Image brief! I’m quite pleased with these despite their obvious flaws, they’re naive stylistically but I’ve really enjoyed experimenting with GIFs this year. With more practice over Summer I think I could create some interesting narratives for future briefs.

They’re not perfect, but here are my four GIFs for the Moving Image brief! I’m quite pleased with these despite their obvious flaws, they’re naive stylistically but I’ve really enjoyed experimenting with GIFs this year. With more practice over Summer I think I could create some interesting narratives for future briefs.

If you ever looked at me once with what I know is in you, I would be your slave.

Since Easter I have been revisiting my sequential narrative brief, where I was focusing on illustrating the final chapter of Wuthering Heights. I mainly wanted to focus on the eerie, romance element of Catherine’s “haunting” of Heathcliff, but to do this I wanted to create a series of atmospheric scenes with no characters and very little text.
There had been some odd weather conditions around where I live recently, so this has helped a great deal in influencing my illustrations - I want them to be dark and gloomy, and show the blustering weather conditions of the Yorkshire moors. I plan on using quotes from Heathcliff intermittently throughout my 16 page book to keep the flow of the narrative, but mainly I want to create something that will absorb the reader and make them feel perhaps a slight chill - I’ll also be using stills from the 2011 adaption by Andrea Arnold to create my scenery.
Since Easter I have been revisiting my sequential narrative brief, where I was focusing on illustrating the final chapter of Wuthering Heights. I mainly wanted to focus on the eerie, romance element of Catherine’s “haunting” of Heathcliff, but to do this I wanted to create a series of atmospheric scenes with no characters and very little text.
There had been some odd weather conditions around where I live recently, so this has helped a great deal in influencing my illustrations - I want them to be dark and gloomy, and show the blustering weather conditions of the Yorkshire moors. I plan on using quotes from Heathcliff intermittently throughout my 16 page book to keep the flow of the narrative, but mainly I want to create something that will absorb the reader and make them feel perhaps a slight chill - I’ll also be using stills from the 2011 adaption by Andrea Arnold to create my scenery.
Since Easter I have been revisiting my sequential narrative brief, where I was focusing on illustrating the final chapter of Wuthering Heights. I mainly wanted to focus on the eerie, romance element of Catherine’s “haunting” of Heathcliff, but to do this I wanted to create a series of atmospheric scenes with no characters and very little text.
There had been some odd weather conditions around where I live recently, so this has helped a great deal in influencing my illustrations - I want them to be dark and gloomy, and show the blustering weather conditions of the Yorkshire moors. I plan on using quotes from Heathcliff intermittently throughout my 16 page book to keep the flow of the narrative, but mainly I want to create something that will absorb the reader and make them feel perhaps a slight chill - I’ll also be using stills from the 2011 adaption by Andrea Arnold to create my scenery.
Since Easter I have been revisiting my sequential narrative brief, where I was focusing on illustrating the final chapter of Wuthering Heights. I mainly wanted to focus on the eerie, romance element of Catherine’s “haunting” of Heathcliff, but to do this I wanted to create a series of atmospheric scenes with no characters and very little text.
There had been some odd weather conditions around where I live recently, so this has helped a great deal in influencing my illustrations - I want them to be dark and gloomy, and show the blustering weather conditions of the Yorkshire moors. I plan on using quotes from Heathcliff intermittently throughout my 16 page book to keep the flow of the narrative, but mainly I want to create something that will absorb the reader and make them feel perhaps a slight chill - I’ll also be using stills from the 2011 adaption by Andrea Arnold to create my scenery.

Since Easter I have been revisiting my sequential narrative brief, where I was focusing on illustrating the final chapter of Wuthering Heights. I mainly wanted to focus on the eerie, romance element of Catherine’s “haunting” of Heathcliff, but to do this I wanted to create a series of atmospheric scenes with no characters and very little text.

There had been some odd weather conditions around where I live recently, so this has helped a great deal in influencing my illustrations - I want them to be dark and gloomy, and show the blustering weather conditions of the Yorkshire moors. I plan on using quotes from Heathcliff intermittently throughout my 16 page book to keep the flow of the narrative, but mainly I want to create something that will absorb the reader and make them feel perhaps a slight chill - I’ll also be using stills from the 2011 adaption by Andrea Arnold to create my scenery.

archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton
Boston
NYC
Dallas
Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 
archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton
Boston
NYC
Dallas
Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 
archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton
Boston
NYC
Dallas
Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 
archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton
Boston
NYC
Dallas
Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 
archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton
Boston
NYC
Dallas
Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 
archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton
Boston
NYC
Dallas
Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 
archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton
Boston
NYC
Dallas
Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 
archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton
Boston
NYC
Dallas
Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 

archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton

  • Boston
  • NYC
  • Dallas
  • Las Vegas

I love this unique approach of creating birds-eye views of cities, this could be a really interesting way to create mementos of places you might have visited, or could be incorporated into a pop-up design somehow. 

(via scopeartshow)

emda-randolph
I’m really interested in the impact that a simple drawn line has. Where I may have driven myself crazy in the past to add complimentary colours to an illustration, I’m beginning to see the strength of a line and how cross hatching techniques can add just as much depth and dimension to an image as colour.

emda-randolph

I’m really interested in the impact that a simple drawn line has. Where I may have driven myself crazy in the past to add complimentary colours to an illustration, I’m beginning to see the strength of a line and how cross hatching techniques can add just as much depth and dimension to an image as colour.

(via wowgreat)

'Professional Practice for Illustrators' retrospective findings from research seminars.

Publishing adult fiction

Generally the first comment made by my non-designer acquaintances once I tell them that I’m studying illustration is, “Oh yeah, like drawings for books and stuff”. Sigh.

As I’ve said before, I was also one of the people whose first thought of the word ‘illustration’ went straight to the Quentin Blake and Beatrix Potter stories that were read to me as a child. So it was interesting to be given a research brief that required us to focus on one writing genre - for me and Tamsin, this was ‘adult fiction’ (is there a way of writing that so it doesn’t sound like I’m referring to erotic literature?) - and find publishing companies that use illustrative book covers. We would also have to think about the styles of illustrations that were used, whether this was an effective/appropriate choice and whether the illustrator was credited and known to us. The publishers that we investigated were four of the ‘Big Six’, Hachette, Harper Collins, Pan Macmillan and Random House, as well as Bloomsbury.

We immediately noticed how the majority of covers used photographic solutions, as was especially common with books ‘of the film’, which had recently been released at the cinema - we used Pan Macmillan’s Warm Bodies as an example of this, as Tamsin had read the book before the film was released and owned a copy with the original cover.

image

We had quite a strong dislike of these designs and thought they were poor decisions, as the previous designs had been beautiful and provoking, yet had been thrown onto the scrapheap in favour of something which would address, and be recognisable to, the wider consumer who wouldn’t necessarily have an appreciation of thoughtfully designed objects. We used the Pan Macmillan website to look at the other fiction covers and saw that illustration was still quite popularly used within the adult fiction genre, however this use varied from small borders and doodles to experimental typography.

What really stuck in our minds after looking at Hachette was the range of chick lit covers that had been created with an author that used a recurring theme of fashion illustration style female characters, usually posed as a silhouette against a block-coloured shape, cursive font and “feminine” colours such as turquoises and candy pinks. Motifs included stilettos, handbags, cupcakes, flowers, stars, lipsticks and hearts and vile foil effects. Again, we left this publisher rather disappointed with the lack of imaginative solutions, as every cover looked pretty much the same when next to each other.

image image image 

Harper Collins, Random House and Bloomsbury again seemed to use photographic solutions and as such paired illustrative cover designs with more child-oriented reading material. This was one of the more frustrating research briefs that Tamsin and I worked together on, however with the Penguin Design competitions it was encouraging to see past entrants attempts at illustrating various age ranged books, so this gave me a little faith in that, whilst the majority of people decide that it’s more marketable and age-appropriate to have adult fiction books as photographic covers, designers and those who can appreciate design are still strongly attempting to address these other types of readers.