06 4 / 2014

archatlas:

Paper Sculptures - United States Cities Matthew Picton

  • Boston
  • NYC
  • Dallas
  • Las Vegas

Potentially a great way to create a map

(via scopeartshow)

26 3 / 2014

emda-randolph
I’m really interested in the impact that a simple drawn line has. Where I may have driven myself crazy in the past to add complimentary colours to an illustration, I’m beginning to see the strength of a line and how cross hatching techniques can add just as much depth and dimension to an image as colour.

emda-randolph

I’m really interested in the impact that a simple drawn line has. Where I may have driven myself crazy in the past to add complimentary colours to an illustration, I’m beginning to see the strength of a line and how cross hatching techniques can add just as much depth and dimension to an image as colour.

(via wowgreat)

24 3 / 2014

Some outcomes from a workshop we had with a visiting illustrator from Spain who gave us some unique ways, based on Surrealist techniques, to free our minds when beginning to put pencil to paper. We listened to odd music and sounds whilst closing our eyes and let the pencil move across the paper, drew blind sketches of our hands and the wrinkles on them, and played a unique game that involved rolling dice to draw cards reading a single word that we’d illustrate in order to create a surreal image.

The ‘exquisite corpse' was one of our favourite techniques and we happened to use the same technique for the workshop that we did with a group of Foundation students as part of our Covert exhibition, designating them as either mammal, fish, bird or reptile to draw in their own style before passing the paper on and asking them to present the finished outcome at the end, and we had some very interesting and thoughtful results!

I quite like the blind continuous line drawings I did, where you’re meant to try and find shapes within the lines if possible in order to give you a starting point for an illustration. Even though I can’t recall the music that was being played at the time, I think it’s quite expressive and spontaneous. For a scribble, anyway.

The birdy-pirate exquisite corpse illustration above being one of the slightly less “graphic” outcomes, we take a swift sideways glance at the booby multiple penis-thing… 

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Avert your eyes children!

24 3 / 2014

Final GIF for the poetry brief from last term See the cringey first attempt here: http://rpsx.tumblr.com/post/65419679394

Final GIF for the poetry brief from last term
See the cringey first attempt here: http://rpsx.tumblr.com/post/65419679394

23 3 / 2014

'Moving Image' - GIF 1 of 4, based on the Surfers Against Sewage 'No Butts On The Beach' campaign (read more here: http://www.sas.org.uk/campaign/no-butts-on-the-beach/). After deciding to move on from my idea of animating a music video, I decided that I’d enjoy it much more to create GIFs based on an environmental issue, and thought to use the Surfers Against Sewage charity as a starting point, having already been familiar with them from a visit to Newquay’s Boardmasters Festival last Summer, who support the charity.
I like the relaxed pace of the GIF and the naive simplicity of the black and white lines I’ve used to illustrate this, however I think I need to add a seventh frame to show smoke being blown from the mouth after the cigarette being lit, as it looks a bit jumpy to me - going from the cigarette in the mouth to it burning down gradually. I’ll also need to reduce the size of the GIF as there looks like there’s a problem with one of the frames.

'Moving Image' - GIF 1 of 4, based on the Surfers Against Sewage 'No Butts On The Beach' campaign (read more here: http://www.sas.org.uk/campaign/no-butts-on-the-beach/).
After deciding to move on from my idea of animating a music video, I decided that I’d enjoy it much more to create GIFs based on an environmental issue, and thought to use the Surfers Against Sewage charity as a starting point, having already been familiar with them from a visit to Newquay’s Boardmasters Festival last Summer, who support the charity.

I like the relaxed pace of the GIF and the naive simplicity of the black and white lines I’ve used to illustrate this, however I think I need to add a seventh frame to show smoke being blown from the mouth after the cigarette being lit, as it looks a bit jumpy to me - going from the cigarette in the mouth to it burning down gradually. I’ll also need to reduce the size of the GIF as there looks like there’s a problem with one of the frames.

20 3 / 2014

Comic art in newspapers and magazines

Our third research seminar required us to work in groups and find comic strip art used within newspapers and magazines, rather than the usual mainstream/independant comic books or graphic novels. Tamsin and I began by thinking about the types of print media that we read ourselves, and almost immediately thought of the Pandora strip that features in the Kerrang! magazine, which we both read in our teens. Kerrang! focuses on rock and metal music, featuring interviews with bands, reviews on newly released albums, current news on festivals and gigs, and so on, and is sold in most commercial distributors like WHSmith, supermarkets and newsagents.

image

After a Google, we found the creator of the Pandora character, Ray Zell, with his website giving quite an informative back story on the development of her character, his methods of drawing with pantone markers and his weekly inspirations for creating the strip - it will normally feature a band that has been interviewed that week for the magazine, or a musical figure that has recently caused controversy in the media. 

The second example was the ongoing cynical, political strip that I knew from reading the Guardian newspaper - Steve Bell’s If… I’ve always admired Bell’s humour behind the strip and the use of wordplay and pun, as well as the unique and oddly accurate way that he presents his caricatures, like David Cameron with a condom on his head, and George Bush as a chimpanzee. Influenced by Leo Baxendale (a freelance cartoonist for The Beano) and Ronald Searle as a child, Bell created short animated films like ‘Margaret Thatcher - Where am I now?’ (Channel 4) and illustrated books with several other authors, often touching upon controversial subjects and receiving his fair share of hate mail!

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Finally we looked at ‘Mad’, which was familiar to Tamsin. It is an American humour magazine which was originally launched as a comic book in 1952, yet evolved into a magazine and follows a satirical style on a range of subjects such as popular culture, politics, public figures and the entertainment industry, which we can see has influenced dozens of others - including the animated series The Simpsons.

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We found that comic strips within newspapers and magazines are different from your average comic books in that they tend to be satirical in nature, created to either reflect the current events occurring at the time, or simply for humour or educational purposes. Illustrative styles can range from naive and childlike, to simplistic black and white line sketches, to bold and crude stylised characters. More often than not, there will be an element of fantasy, whether it’s an animal that’s able to speak, or a person with supernatural abilities such as flight.

The audiences of our researched examples appear to address teens to younger adults (Pandora andMad) up to older adults and the “left wing middle class” (If…). The styles of illustration that we found were well suited for the context they were used in and fitted the ‘image’ of the media that they were printed in, using effective and memorable illustrative styles. It was interesting to look into the illustrators who created these strips, as their names are normally something you’ll notice when reading the media they were produced for, yet I’d never thought to research into them and the other work they had done throughout their career. Though comic strips aren’t something that I’d particularly want to go into, I can appreciate them for what they are and their humour.

19 3 / 2014

Editorial illustration in magazines

What interested me most about illustrating for editorials was how the specialized subjects that you may show in your portfolio can be totally unrelated to the genre of magazine that you can get a commission for. For the first research seminar for our Professional Practice module, I was required to select a genre of magazine, find atleast 10 titles, and distinguish the styles of illustration within them. After initially choosing medical and nursing magazines and finding very little illustration, I decided to switch my focus onto young women’s lifestyle magazines, where I found a decent amount within each example.

I began with a magazine that I was already familiar with, Oh, Comely, which I had originally found in WHSmith during my foundation year. More or less every page included illustration in one form or another - whether this was a decorative border, an accompanying full page example of a featured creatives work, doodled letters or games. It was interesting to see how the magazine’s website encourages writers, illustrators, photographers, etc. to submit pieces of work to be potential features in future issues.

This was also the case with a magazine that I serendipitously discovered via the realm of Twitter, Ballad Of…, that was started by two Photography graduates and exclusively publishes “Brand New Art We Heart”. They also keep an online directory of every creative that has contributed to their past issues, as well as giving creatives an incentive to have their work featured in their next issue by giving themes, such as ‘sugar and spice’, for them to submit visual or conceptual responses. Whilst I could only view this magazine online via screenshots on their website (stockists weren’t particularly local to me), it looks as though a lot of illustrators contribute to their issues, and whilst I see a handful of decorational motifs being used, it seems that the majority of the pages are filled with photographic responses.

Lionheart was another chance Twitter find, following the same crafty-quirky-feminine vibe as my two previous examples. Again, I unfortunately couldn’t get my hands on a tangible copy to flick through, but online PDFs revealed that every front cover is illustrated and an article in issue 3 featured illustrator Ella Masters who focuses on ‘authorial’ illustration, her website demonstrating many examples of commercial editorial work in portraiture and figurative fashion styles.

Within her client list was Cellardoor, which I was luckily able to look through a little more in-depth thanks to their magazine being featured on issuu. Within issue 9 were lovely narrative based illustrations from featured illustrator Rosie Lovelock, as well as more or less every page featuring some kind of cute illustrated thumbnail tab, decorational border, collage, or fashion drawing.

Issuu.com also carried titles Dalliance and Vintage Lifestyle which were of relevance, again using fashion doodles, borders and portraiture, but less so than previous examples. Baku and Fashion, Cosmopolitan were more widely known examples found in WHSmith and feature contemporary art, culture, fashion and travel and use full page illustration and double spreads for creatives and designers, such as Niki Groom.

The only exception I made to sticking to this genre was by looking at Anorak, which is a children’s magazine, yet I couldn’t resist adding to the presentation. Aimed towards kids aged between 6 and 12, it was created to encourage children to tap into their imagination and use creativity to learn, and theres an astounding use of colour, shapes and contemporary image making, using edge to edge full/double page illustrations, charts, questions, stories and games.

Looking over the titles that I found for the seminar, it was generally fairly easy to locate them, and they included the types of illustration that I would expect from young women’s lifestyle - pretty, decorational doodles, figurative fashion and portraiture in a contemporary style. Although I didn’t think I initially knew any of the illustrators that I came across, I was surprised after digging around a bit to realise I had already seen work by Marisa Seguin and Alyssa Nassner (who were contributing illustrators for issue 7 of Oh, Comely) before from reblogs on Tumblr. All in all, I was quite impressed to see the amount of illustration used by editors, as opposed to the simpler option of using photographic solutions.

16 3 / 2014

Our group exhibition is up and running at the Collective Collaborations gallery space after a (really rather shamefully fatiguing) few days installing our pieces, we got to enjoy a rather jolly opening launch night last Thursday (see some piccies here).

Overall I’m pretty pleased with my results, it’s given me much more confidence to try new things that will be on a slightly bigger and more public scale, however, I’m still scrutinising over the smaller details of the installation that others probably wouldn’t even have noticed - but I’m sure most people do the same over their own work. 

The first draft of my business card that’s been left in the gallery space for the public is on the bottom right, which I feel rounds me and my style up quite neatly. I didn’t notice before how much inspiration I seem to take from Disney princesses - with the roses, big eyes and dresses. Unfortunately though the finished thing did look a bit unprofessional as I ended up spending more on the materials for the exhibition than planned, and as such I ended up photocopying the design onto plain cartridge paper and cutting them into squares with a guillotine… yuck. I definitely want to re-use this design though when I make some proper cards for myself over the next few months, with some slight adjustments such as including my name, course and email address.

I’m really grateful for this experience and it’s been so rewarding, not only because of the compliments I’ve received, but to simply to see how we as a group have responded to the same brief so differently, yet in a way that compliments each other quite nicely within the space. I certainly feel a little more clued in on the sheer lengths of detail that creatives go through to organise one of these things!